Edited by Christopher J. Earle

Due to its rarity, it is of conservation concern. A relatively large tree in habitat, at Point Lobos, California [C.J. Their wood is light, moderately hard, and very durable in contact with the soil but is usually knotty and has an odour sometimes considered offensive. Hesperocyparis macrocarpa is a medium-sized coniferous evergreen tree, which often becomes irregular and flat-topped as a result of the strong winds that are typical of its native area. The foliage grows in dense sprays which are bright green in color and release a deep lemony aroma when crushed. Earle, 2015.03.04]. The leaves are scale-like, 2–5 mm long, and produced on rounded (not flattened) shoots; seedlings up to a year old have needle-like leaves 4–8 mm long. This tree is widely cultivated as an ornamental tree as an alternative to the Monterey cypress because it offers much better resistance to cypress canker and fungal diseases. The natural habitat is noted for its cool, moist summers, almost constantly bathed by sea fog.

Jepson, W. L. 1923. The largest tree in Great Britain is 36 m tall, dbh 320 cm, in Strete Ralegh, Devon (Mitchell et al.

[4] Historically during the peak of the last ice age, Monterey cypress would have likely comprised a much larger forest that extended to the continental shelf. Monterey cypress has been widely cultivated away from its native range, both elsewhere along the California coast, and in other areas with similar cool summer, mild winter oceanic climates. When planted in areas with hot summers, for example in interior California away from the coastal fog belt, Monterey cypress has proved highly susceptible to cypress canker, caused by the fungus Seiridium cardinale, and rarely survives more than a few years.

The largest in the US was remeasured in January 2015 and found to be 31.1 m tall, dbh 475.8 cm, with a 33.8 m crown spread.

Leaves without gland or sometimes with inconspicuous, shallow, pitlike, abaxial gland that does not produce drop of resin, not glaucous. Washington, DC: American Forests.

Monterey cypress.

It is 23.8 m tall with a dbh of 463.1 cm and a crown spread of 29.5 m (Brad Cadwallader email 2012.04.14). It is known from fossils to have been in other regions. Seed cones oblong, 2.5-4 cm, grayish brown, not glaucous; scales 4-6 pairs, smooth, umbo nearly flat at maturity. [5][6], This species has been widely planted outside its native range, particularly along the coasts of California and Oregon. Cupressus macrocarpa. His work among the conifers is commemorated in the alpine pine of Mexico and Central America, Pinus hartwegii. Family Cupressaceae . [citation needed] For example, a copse has been planted to commemorate South African infantrymen who lost their lives in the Allied cause in Italy and North Africa during World War 2. Other articles where Monterey cypress is discussed: cypress: …from the Bhutan, Italian, and Monterey cypresses (C. torulosa, C. sempervirens, and C. macrocarpa, respectively).

[9] The renowned Californian botanist Willis Linn Jepson wrote that "the advertisement of [C. macrocarpa trees] in seaside literature as 1,000 to 2,000 years old does not ... rest upon any actual data, and probably represents a desire to minister to a popular craving for superlatives". However, fire suppression at Point Lobos is causing low regeneration and prescribed fire treatments will probably be necessary at some time to maintain a wide population age structure. The largest tree there, identified and measured in 2012, is in Awhitu, south of Auckland. The female seed cones are shiny, round, and about 1 inch in diameter, covered with 8 to 12 light-brown scales. It often attains impressive sizes, and does so quickly. Possibly as old as 250 years, the cypress has been scarred by fire and has been held in place with cables for 65 years. The much smaller yellow male cones, only ¼ inch long, produce copious amounts of pollen in the late winter and early spring. \"Trees to 25 m; crown generally broadly spreading, especially on exposed headlands, fairly sparse, often composed of few major limbs from near ground, more upright in sheltered locations. It has also been grown experimentally as a timber crop in Kenya.[5][7]. Standing on a granite hillside off the 17-Mile Drive, the tree is a Western icon, and has been called one of the most photographed trees in North America. "Trees to 25 m; crown generally broadly spreading, especially on exposed headlands, fairly sparse, often composed of few major limbs from near ground, more upright in sheltered locations. In New Zealand, where it is also widespread, it is simply known as "macrocarpa". The species is moderately serotinous. It is a popular private garden and public landscape tree in California.

Earle, 2014.01.18]. [13][14], The two native cypress forest stands are protected, within Point Lobos State Reserve and Del Monte Forest. It is commonly known as the Monterey cypress and is one of several species of cypress trees endemic to California.

Seeds mostly 5-6 mm, dark brown, not glaucous. Price. The National Register of Big Trees 2000.

The seed cones are globose to oblong, 20–40 mm long, with 6–14 scales, green at first, maturing brown about 20–24 months after pollination. It is a popular private garden and public landscape tree in California. Monterey cypress trees (Cupressus macrocarpa) in the United Kingdom Monterey cypress trees (Cupressus macrocarpa) worldwide. The Lone Cypress is a Monterey cypress tree in Pebble Beach, California. …from the Bhutan, Italian, and Monterey cypresses (C. torulosa, C. sempervirens, and C. macrocarpa, respectively).

(1999). See also Thompson et al. B. Jackson & Dallimore) Dallimore, and xCuprocyparis leylandii (A. It is normally dependent on fire in its coastal sage scrub habitat to cause opening of cones and dispersal of seeds, but some cones will open under conditions of moderate heat (such as on hot summer days) and some regeneration occurs in unburned habitat. jemail("pingora", "protonmail", "com"); [IDS] International Dendrology Society Yearbook 1996, page 92. [5][6][7] The Latin specific epithet macrocarpa means "with large fruit". Distribution: Endemic to central coast of California; cultivated throughout North America and Europe.